NEC Report to ABS Board at ABS Annual Conference

Submitted and presented by NEC Rep, Susanne Lucas (filling in for Scott Ritchie)

September 9, 2014   San Marino, California – The Huntington Botanical Gardens

The current NEC Board of Directors:

> Scott Ritchie, President (terms ends 2016), Baltimore MD
> Susanne Lucas, VP (2016), Plymouth, MA
> Stephanie Ritchie, Sec (2016), Baltimore, MD
> Fran Bartholomew, Treasury (2015), Albany, NY
> Dave Flanagan (2015), Boston, MA
> Whitney Adams (2015), Groton, CT
> Mike Bartholomew (2014), Albany, NY
> Ned Newton (2014), Westport, MA

> alternate: Larry Holland (2014), Amenia, NY

> alternate:  Anthony Poveromo (2016), Amenia, NY

NEC President Scott Ritchie and his wife Stephanie Ritchie (NEC Secretary) organized a wonderful spring meeting at the Cylburn Arboretum in Baltimore, Maryland, the weekend of June 21st. The site has a long history of gardening, dating back to 1863.  This 170-acre site is owned and managed by the city of Baltimore and is an impressive gem.  Scott works here as a staff horticulturist, and is perhaps solely responsible for the fact that the arboretum has any bamboo at all.   Our small but intrepid group toured the various plantings and spent time talking about the past winter’s effect on our own bamboos, cultural info on various species, the need to divide and root prune contained runners, and enjoyed each other’s company.  I gave a powerpoint presentation on my recently published book and also showed some pics from a recent trip to Taiwan and China.

It must be said that we were disappointed more people did not come out for this event.  Why don’t we get more people from our Chapter out to events?   Do the majority of members only need a newsletter?

No other events are planned for this year, although I wish there were.

I continue to post on the NEC page of the ABS website, and luckily a few other people post from time to time, too.

~ Susanne Lucas

p.s.  After the ABS Board Meeting and the ABS Members Meeting, I was elected Co-Vice President, serving with Bill Hollenback.  Stay tuned to ABS news via BAMBOO magazine.

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Free potted bamboo!

Hello bamboo lovers,
I have quite a few pots with indoor bamboo in CT.
They  have spent summer on the porch and I am giving them away as have
no time to split them/report and continue to take care.
I live on 95 between New London and New Haven.
If anyone needs them- stop by before frosts.
I have bought them long ago in MA bamboo place, do not remember their names.
Please send NE chapter mail with this info.
Thanks,
Tamara.

Contact:

Tamara Potselueva <tamara@healyourself.us

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National Public Radio interview with Susanne Lucas, September 5, 2014

Listen here:

http://wnpr.org/post/diverse-durable-and-edible-bamboo

Susanne answered this call, after Scott Ritchie’s suggestion:

<<I’m a producer for the public radio call-in show on WNPR in Hartford, CT called Where We Live. I’m interested in putting together an hour-long show about bamboo and I figured this would be the perfect place to start. There are lots of different aspects to this and we’d just like to explore the various uses for bamboo, from decoration, to building, to eating.

I’d love to have a bamboo enthusiast join us in-studio for the hour as the “buddy” for our host John Dankosky next Friday (9/5) from 9-10am. Then throughout the hour, I’d have other guests calling in to talk about their specific uses for bamboo. Would you or someone affiliated with your organization be able to join us as a bamboo generalist?

Where We Live broadcasts like from 9-10am out of our Hartford studio. If someone could join us in our studio here, that would be great. We could also try to find a radio studio closer to the guest’s location.

Thanks,  Tucker Ives

Tucker Ives   Producer, Where We Live   1049 Asylum Ave.

Hartford, CT 06105
tives@wnpr.org

www.wnpr.org
Work: 860-275-7281

Cell/Text: 860-614-0567

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BBC Radio Interview with Susanne Lucas

On the program, The Forum, the discussion is all about grasses, with specific focus on rice and BAMBOO.  The program first aired on August 18, but is still available as a podcast, online. Listen here :

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p024hhnj

 

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From Whitney Adams; THANKS, WHITNEY!

From April 8, 2014

Hi Ed, Thank you for the hardiness information.  My bamboos have been pretty much burned up.  Sasa palmata is all tan, etc.

After just emailing you there are some additional details that occurred to me.  The “rufas” were originally collected by the Shanghai Botanic Garden and offered to van der Palen in the Netherlands who acquired them.  Later Susanne acquired them and decided to tissue culture the wider-leafed one.  So far as I know, the narrower-leafed one has not been tissue cultured yet.

The following blue text is quoted from van der Palen’s website:

<<Fargesia ‘Rufa’
In the spring of 1995, I received a fax sent from the Botanical Garden of Shanghai, asking if I would be interested in specific bamboos. A staff member of the Botanical Garden had collected two bamboos in the south of the Chinese province Ganzhu. These plants were collected at elevations of 1,800 to 2,500m (5,900 to 8,200 feet) at latitude 34°20 N and longitude 106°00 E.
Here the average annual temperature is 8°C (46°F), and temperatures go down to -16.8°C (0°F) in winter. During the summer, the highest temperature can be 29.6°C (85°F).

We decided to call these plants Gansu 95-1 and Gansu 95-2 for the time being. The young plants of Gansu 95-1 grew amazingly well. In the first winter, it was observed that the leaves did not curl in dry conditions, during frosts or in direct sunlight, unlike the leaves of Fargesia nitida and Fargesia murieliae. Even the shedding of leaves, as is usual preceding winter with most Fargesias, was limited. This bamboo had no difficulty at all with the severe winter of 96/97, when temperatures went down to -19°C (-3°F) with the graceful leaves remaining green. Only extended periods of very low temperature with dry continental winds are endured less well by this bamboo than by the leaf-rolling types.

Already in April new shoots appear, which is in fact too early for the young shoots, which are sensitive to late frost. The height of the culms is between 2 and 3 m and because of the large number of leaves the culms arch over. New culms develop about 5-15 cm from the plant so after 5 years the plants can attain a diameter of up 2 m. This bamboo takes up available space at least three times as quick as Fargesia murieliae. In fact this bamboo would look its best in parks and large gardens, adding a fine touch to these places. The deep green leaves and the plant’s full silhouette stand in dynamic contrast to more static plants like Rhododendrons, cherry laurel and yew.

Naming the new plants
Our friends in China who sent us the plants proposed the name Fargesia spathacea. However, this name had already been assigned unjustly to Fargesia murieliae and later on to Fargesia nitida, and this time too, it did not fit.

In southern Gansu only a few bamboo species are found. The plant certainly was not Yushania confusa and we already knew Fargesia dracocephala. Then we came to Fargesia rufa. The visual resemblance with the two pictures of this species in the most important Chinese bamboo book ‘A Compendium of Chinese Bamboo’ and also the region of origin pointed in this direction. From then on, when the plants were distributed among growers and collectors this name started to lead its own life. When we study this species in more detail, we find characteristics of both Fargesia dracocephala and Fargesia rufa, both species being native to this region. It should be clear that bamboos from natural resources do not easily fit our classification systems.

My proposal is to name this bamboo Fargesia ‘Rufa’, given its already widely known name. Not only does the name sound well, but also when in the future the species should be known more exactly, the species name can easily be placed between the generic name Fargesia and the cultivar name ‘Rufa’. Gansu 2 was also a nice bamboo, but it turned out to be a shade tolerant form of Fargesia nitida, and it did not grow much higher than 2m (61/2 feet). >>

The latitude/longitude location using Google earth shows it to be a particularly rich floristic area in Gansu that, as I remember, the Arnold Arboretum and other institutions were particularly interested in visiting.  They may have done so by now.

Susanne probably has additional information.

Best wishes

Whitney

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From Ned Newton; THANKS, NED!

From March 24, 2014

Since you asked, I thought I would give you a few bullets on bamboo at my place this winter (dare I say spring yet). The forecast is for more snow and last night it was down to 14 F. If the below is worth sending on to others, please do. I know you are busy, but if you could check the spelling and naming before sending, I would be grateful.

1. I did a study several winters ago comparing actual exposed temperature against the official temperature which is shaded from radiation cooling. The night time temperatures averaged 5 to as much as 10 degrees colder in the open. With the 5 degrees for the colder, 15 to 20 degree nights. So, what does this mean to me the gardener? Plant zones and temperature ratings for plants are given by the minimum temperature. But, are these actual measured temperatures at the plant or official weather station temperatures? For back yard gardens and small plantings we are really interested in micro-climates at the location we are planting our bamboo. This can vary by many degrees, particularly around buildings. So, the best we can hope is that the catalog listings of minimum temperatures are accurate. Then we should adjust our expectation of minimum temperatures for the exact location. This would mean reducing an exposed location by 5 to 10 degrees from the “official” minimum temperature for the area. Of course nature is never too precise, and there are several levels of loss due to low temperatures: loss of leaves, loss of culm, and finally loss of the whole plant, rhizomes.
2. This past winter my lowest, shaded, temperature was 4 degrees on a clear night, and this is the lowest I have seen in 15 years. I am in zone 7a which is supposed to have a minimum temperature of between 0 and 5. Pretty accurate.
3. For the first time every bamboo on my property has their leaves desiccated; yes even the rock hardy, Phyllostachys parvifolia. Hopefully they will re-leaf in the spring. However, I plan to cut to the ground the Sasa palmate f. nebulosa, Indocalamus solidas, Hibanobambusa tranquillans ‘Shiroshima’, and Pleioblastus viridi striatus ‘Chrisofila’ . I hope this is not too drastic, but I would like new fresh leaves for the summer. They are all spreading, and so a cut back in growth would also be desirable.
4. The Sasa palmate f. nebulosa, Indocalamus solidas, and Pleioblastus viridi striatus ‘Chrisofila’ are absolutely beautiful with their solid pale tan leaves. What a treat, since they are right at the end of the driveway and seen every time I go by.
5. Something very unusual, at least for me, has happened to the Fargesia group here at my home. They are all standing straight and tall, except perhaps the F. rufa which has an ever so slight curve, no whereas near a bow as usual. They also all have dried leaves. The standing tall looks great in the garden where I have them. However, I have on my list of winter things to do to prune back the clumps to provide room for the neighboring plants which are getting crowded out. Now that they are straight, there is no problem. I suppose I should plan ahead and assume they will again be bowing when the spring comes and things warm up. The Fargesia which are so affected are: F. rufa; F. rufa, narrow leaved; F. robusta; F. nitida ‘Jiuzhaigou’; and F. denudate. The narrow leaved version of rufa is, right now, much straighter than the usual rufa. The first time I have noticed any difference between the two.
6. I am getting older and weaker, and so we are cutting back on the Phyllostachys collection. Quite a shame since to me they are the “real” bamboo. There is nothing like walking through a grove. If anyone wants rhizomes of P. aureosulcate ‘Aureocaulis’, please give me a call. The bed is approximately 48 by 11 feet.

 

7. Elizabeth and I always enjoy the bamboo group. So, if you all would like to come for a visit this spring/summer we would be honored.

Edmund (Ned) Newton
427 Horseneck Road
South Dartmouth, MA 02748
508.636.4920

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NEC Spring Meeting, Cylburn Arboretum

July 5, 2014

Big thanks go out to NEC President Scott Ritchie for organizing a wonderful spring meeting at the Cylburn Arboretum in Baltimore, Maryland, the weekend of June 21st. The site has a long history of gardening, dating back to 1863. This 170-acre site is owned and managed by the city of Baltimore and is an impressive gem. Scott works here as a staff horticulturist, and is perhaps solely responsible for the fact that the arboretum has any bamboo at all. Our small but intrepid group toured the various plantings and spent time talking about the past winter’s effect on our own bamboos, cultural info on various species, the need to divide and root prune contained runners, and enjoyed each other’s company. I gave a powerpoint presentation on my recently published book and also showed some pics from a recent trip to Taiwan and China. Additional thanks go to Steph Ritchie for managing all the food & drinks!

It must be said that we were disappointed more people did not come out for this event. As volunteers and crusaders, putting together even a small outing takes time and energy. In my case, I traveled over 300 miles. Joan Greenwood came from NYC. Elizabeth Aldrich drove over from Annapolis. Tom Starr drove down from Pennsylvania. The Ritchie’s put it all together. Why don’t we get more people from our Chapter out to events? Do the majority of members only need a newsletter? Isn’t it great to share time with actual bambuseros and learn from the exchange of conversation and the visiting of new places? Or should we start a chat group and only meet in cyber-ville??? Please let Scott or myself know what you’d like the NEC to do next. Anonymity is fine. We sincerely want our Chapter to be lively and thrive and grow, but we need your help. Please take the time to tell us, as a member of NEC, why you are a member and what you’d like to see us do next.

As for the discussion on the winter’s wrath, let’s just say most of the bamboos are recovering, slowing and hesitantly. My huge Fargesia robusta Wolong died to the ground, but the roots pushed up some wimpy leaf-laden whips of about 3 feet long. Phyllostachys parvifolia has yet to send up even one new shoot, but the impressive growth of last year survived only minor leaf burn. Noah sent me some clumpers to “trial” last fall, and amazingly, the Chusquea culeou survived and made some nice new culms last month! So, one never knows.

‘Hope to see you at the Huntington in September for the ABS Annual Meeting!

2014-06-21 11.47.09~ Susanne Lucas

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NEC Spring 2014 Meeting: June 21st!

Hello old friends and new members!

Time for a spring/summer meeting.

I’ve set us up for June 21st at the Cylburn Arboretum in Baltimore MD. We’ll start about 9am and go until we can’t boo anymore (about 3pm).

Cylburn a unique gem in Northern Baltimore City, 250+ acres with 70 horticultural acres centered around a 1880′s stone mansion. With modern facilities, six glass greenhouses (which I manage for the City’s Horticuliture Division) and plantings of various bamboos; including a native species, Cylburn is a great meeting site.

Hopefully I will see all you members there, especially some Directors, and local promotion will get some new interest. We’ll talk about culture, care, splitting and crafting. There be an auction or rare plant sale too. Bring work gear because we’ll do some field work.

There is a Holiday Inn and a Radisson near by for accommodations. We’ll provide lunch, entertainment, and possibly cocktails.

For more info reply or call me, Scott at 410 960 6868
Cylburn Arboretum
4915 Greenspring Ave.
Baltimore MD 21209
http://cylburn.org/

In other news the national ABS conference has been moved from Oct. to Sept. 12-14th at Huntington Gardens outside of Los Angeles. But there as been some confusion in SoCal on this front so we are still waiting to hear the official outcome. I’ll let everyone know the news as soon as I hear it.

- Scott Ritchie, NEC President and NEC Chapter Rep

email  <baltobucaneer@msn.com>

 

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From Ned Newton, Westport, MA

<< Since you asked, I thought I would give you a few bullets on bamboo at my place this winter (dare I say spring yet).  The forecast (March 24) is for more snow and last night it was down to 14 F.

1.       I did a study several winters ago comparing actual exposed temperature against the official temperature which is shaded from radiation cooling.  The night time temperatures averaged 5 to as much as 10 degrees colder in the open.  With the 5 degrees for the colder, 15 to 20 degree nights.  So, what does this mean to me the gardener?  Plant zones and temperature ratings for plants are given by the minimum temperature.  But, are these actual measured temperatures at the plant or official weather station temperatures?  For back yard gardens and small plantings we are really interested in micro-climates at the location we are planting our bamboo.  This can vary by many degrees, particularly around buildings.  So, the best we can hope is that the catalog listings of minimum temperatures are accurate.  Then we should adjust our expectation of minimum temperatures for the exact location.  This would mean reducing an exposed location by 5 to 10 degrees from the “official” minimum temperature for the area.  Of course nature is never too precise, and there are several levels of loss due to low temperatures:  loss of leaves, loss of culm, and finally loss of the whole plant, rhizomes.

2.       This past winter my lowest, shaded, temperature was 4 degrees on a clear night, and this is the lowest I have seen in 15 years.  I am in zone 7a which is supposed to have a minimum temperature of between 0 and 5.  Pretty accurate.

3.       For the first time every bamboo on my property has their leaves desiccated;  yes even the rock hardy, Phyllostachys parvifolia.  Hopefully they will re-leaf in the spring.  However, I plan to cut to the ground the Sasa palmata f. nebulosa, Indocalamus solidas, Hibanobambusa tranquillans ‘Shiroshima’, and Pleioblastus viridistriatus ‘Chrysophylla’ .  I hope this is not too drastic, but I would like new fresh leaves for the summer.  They are all spreading, and so a cut back in growth would also be desirable.

4.       The Sasa palmata f. nebulosa, Indocalamus solidas, and Pleioblastus viridi- striatus ‘Chrysophylla’ are absolutely beautiful with their solid pale tan leaves.  What a treat, since they are right at the end of the driveway and seen every time I go by.

5.       Something very unusual, at least for me, has happened to the Fargesia group here at my home.  They are all standing straight and tall, except perhaps the F. rufa which has an ever so slight curve, no whereas near a bow as usual.  They also all have dried leaves.  The standing tall looks great in the garden where I have them.  However, I have on my list of winter things to do to prune back the clumps to provide room for the neighboring plants which are getting crowded out.  Now that they are straight, there is no problem.  I suppose I should plan ahead and assume they will again be bowing when the spring comes and things warm up.  The Fargesia which are so affected are:  F. rufa;  F. rufa, narrow leaved;  F. robusta;  F. nitida ‘Jiuzhaigou’;  and F. denudata.  The narrow leaved version of rufa is, right now, much straighter than the usual rufa.  The first time I have noticed any difference between the two.

6.       I am getting older and weaker, and so we are cutting back on the Phyllostachys collection.  Quite  a shame since to me they are the “real” bamboo.  There is nothing like walking through a grove.  If anyone wants rhizomes of P. aureosulcata ‘Aureocaulis’,  please give me a call.  The bed is approximately 48  by 11 feet.

7.       Elizabeth and I always enjoy the bamboo group.  So, if you all would like to come for a visit this spring/summer we would be honored. >>

 

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From Whitney Adams, Groton CT

<< Yes, the bamboo law in CT is inconvenient.  I am reducing the size of my Phyllostachys plantings.  They do get a little overly vigorous at times.  However, I am retaining all my other running bamboos like Borinda solidus?, S. palmata, Shibatea kumasaca, I. tesselatus, etc.

My P. nuda started flowering last summer, so maybe it will not be a problem to remove. This is the time when the clump-forming bamboos will become even more appreciated than they are now.  They sure are beautiful! >>

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